ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 377-380

Outcomes following spliced vein graft and composite graft as conduit for infrainguinal bypass: An institutional experience


Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Kauvery Hospital, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. S Arun Prasath
Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Kauvery Hospital, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijves.ijves_73_22

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Background: Peripheral arterial disease is a significant health care burden globally. Treatment options for limb salvage include open surgical bypass or endovascular revascularization. One of the vital prerequisite for successful infrainguinal bypass is the availability of good conduit. Not all patients have good quality great saphenous vein of adequate length to facilitate bypass. In these scenarios, splicing of available autologous veins and synthetic graft with vein cuff are alternate options. Aim: To compare the outcomes of infrainguinal bypass done for patients with chronic limb threatening ischemia in two groups In Group I, non spliced GSV was the conduit used. In Group II, either spliced vein graft or synthetic graft with vein cuff was used. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study done in a tertiary care centre over a period of 40 months. Ipsilateral Great Saphenous Vein (GSV) was our preferred conduit. In the absence of good calibre GSV, splicing of available autologous veins were done. Only when autologous veins were not available synthetic graft was used with distal vein cuff. Results: A total of 52 patients have undergone bypass during the study period of which 15 patients (28.8%) did not have good calibre GSV. Splicing of autologous veins were done for 10 patients (19.2 %) and synthetic graft with vein cuff was used for 5 patients (9.6%). One year graft patency in group I was 81% and in group II was 66.6%. Limbs were salvaged in 86% of patients in either groups. The mortality rate was 8.1% and 6.6% in groups I & II respectively. Conclusion: When good caliber GSV is not available, splicing of available autologous veins provide comparable patency and should be preferred over synthetic graft. Synthetic graft provides acceptable limb salvage rate when used with an adjunctive procedure like vein cuff for tibial bypasses and should be used when autologous veins are not available or when the patient carries a high risk for major surgery.


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